Spotting essays written by AI

A few weeks ago, the press reported that ‘researchers’ at Cambridge University had complied a list of indications that student essays have been written by AI tools. The source of the press reports was a short article at https://www.cambridge.org/news-and-insights/news/does-chat-gpt-make-the-grade-cambridge-research According to the article, the researchers described ChatGPT’s default writing style as echoing ‘the bland, clipped, and…… Continue reading Spotting essays written by AI

Copilot is aware that it has no self-awareness

Me: Would you pass the Turing test? Microsoft Copilot: I appreciate your curiosity! However, I’m an AI language model, and while I strive to assist, I don’t have consciousness or self-awareness. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask! 😊 At least Copilot wasn’t ‘hallucinating’. When the machines started hallucinating – Language Miscellany

How much are AI tools writing out in the wild?

A recent paper suggests that between 6% and 16% of the text of peer reviews for some major recent conferences on machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) may have been written with substantial help from Large Language Models (LLM), such as ChatGPT. The paper makes these estimates in illustrating a method for estimating how…… Continue reading How much are AI tools writing out in the wild?

Google Translate takes on Goethe

I recently posted my translation of Goethe’s poem Kennst du das Land, wo die Zitronen blühn? with a commentary on my translation, and the German original Do you know that land where lemons grow? – Language Miscellany In a comment on that post, Paul Pacter supplied a translation he’d obtained from Google Translate. Paul commented…… Continue reading Google Translate takes on Goethe

When the machines started hallucinating

The Cambridge Dictionary—an online dictionary for learners of English—has added a new meaning to its definition of ‘hallucinate’ and has picked ‘hallucinate’ as its Word of the Year for 2023. Cambridge Dictionary names ‘Hallucinate’ Word of the Year 2023 | University of Cambridge Hallucinating ‘false information’ This year has seen a surge in interest in…… Continue reading When the machines started hallucinating

Does training of AI models rely too much on input from other AI models?

Large Language Models (LLMs, like Chat GPT) use a large body of existing texts in training themselves so that they can answer questions by producing text that looks like the work of humans. The underlying texts used in training LLMs should be generated by humans—but are they? Researchers from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology…… Continue reading Does training of AI models rely too much on input from other AI models?