• Brighthelmstone by the sea
    We aren’t usually surprised if the spelling of a place name diverges from how we pronounce the name today. This often happens  because of major sound changes long ago. But I recently came across a spelling that shortened radically less than 200 years ago. The name of the southern English seaside town Brighton was still… Continue reading Brighthelmstone by the sea
  • Odd gap in the English genitive
    I recently saw a statement about ‘feedback on Jane and my visit to London’. The phrase ‘Jane and my visit’ seems ungrammatical to me. This post considers why. It looks at how to form genitives of nouns, co-ordinated noun phrases and personal pronouns. It then goes on to consider whether it is possible to form… Continue reading Odd gap in the English genitive
  • Pāṇini and Panini
    A great grammarian of Sanskrit, Pāṇini, lived sometime around the 6th to the 4th century BCE. Pāṇini is often considered to be the first great descriptive linguist. The name Pāṇini is not to be confused with name of the Italian sandwiches known as panini.  https://languagemiscellany.com/2022/06/paninis-apostrophes/ According to a comment made by a user on a… Continue reading Pāṇini and Panini

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox

Follow this blog on social media