Scandinavian language challenge day 22

Today I worked through chapter 7 of Danish in three months, covering: possessive pronounsadjectives: comparative and superlativeimpersonal pronounother words Possessive pronouns min / mit / minedin / dit / dineDereshanshendesdensdets vor / vort / vorejeresDeresderesderesderesderes As in Swedish and Norwegian, the form sin / sint / sine is used in stead of hans / hendes /…… Continue reading Scandinavian language challenge day 22

Satisfying anagram

The following clue appeared recently in The Times crossword: Capable of making tin cans (7 letters) The answer was Stannic. Like many cryptic crossword clues, this one contains two components: Instructions for assembling the answer. In this case, making is an indication that the answer is an anagram of material in the clue. The answer…… Continue reading Satisfying anagram

Scandinavian language challenge day 21

Today I worked through chapter 6 of Norwegian in three months, covering: perfect tensemodal auxiliary verbscomparison of adverbsmore about adverbsexpressions of timeother words Perfect tense The perfect tense is formed by using the auxiliary ha (have) with the past participle. For some verbs, the auxiliary være instead of ha (to be covered in chapter 7). Example:I…… Continue reading Scandinavian language challenge day 21

Scandinavian language challenge day 20

Today I worked through chapter 6 of Swedish in three months, covering: conjunctionsword order in subordinate clausesmore about word order in main clausesperfect and pluperfect tensesirregular verbsother words Conjunctions Co-ordinating conjunctions link main clauses together. Common examples: ellerförmen orbeforebut utanochså afterandso Eller is used in a common form of tag question:Han har två bilar, eller hur.He…… Continue reading Scandinavian language challenge day 20

Scandinvian language challenge day 19

Today I worked through chapter 6 of Danish in three months, covering: telling the timepast tense: modal auxiliariesprepositionsother words Telling the time Danes use the 24 hour clock in writing. Havd er klokken / Hvor mange er klokken?den er (klokken) ét / klokken tretten (13.00)halv to / ét tredive (13.30) As in German, halv to is…… Continue reading Scandinvian language challenge day 19

What is that aioi?

An unusual translation error. This English translation contains the mysterious word “aioi”. Context, some guesswork and a quick google of the Spanish original (coartada) indicate that this is a misprint for “alibi”. Picture taken in 2017 at Centro de Interpretación Judería de Sevilla  

Scandinavian language challenge day 18

Today I worked through chapter 5 of Norwegian in three months, covering: the past tense of weak verbs and strong verbsadverbsword orderordinal numbers Past tense: weak verbs Most weak verbs form the past tense by adding the suffix -et or -te to the stem. (Verbs with a stem ending in -ll, -mm or -nn drop the…… Continue reading Scandinavian language challenge day 18

Scandinavian language challenge day 17

Today I worked through chapter 5 of Swedish in three months, covering: asking and telling the timepossessive adjectives and possessive pronounspast tense of strong verbsomitting the indefinite articlerelative pronounsother words and idioms Asking and telling the time Hur mycket är klockan? / Vad är klockan? What is the time? Klockan är ett. / Det är ett.…… Continue reading Scandinavian language challenge day 17

Scandinavian language challenge day 16

Today I worked through chapter 5 of Danish in three months, covering: numbers (cardinal and ordinal)past tense and past participlesome common irregular verbsperfect tenseother words Numbers 0123456789101112132021 Cardinalnulén / ettotrefirefemsekssyvottenitiellevetolvtrettentyveenogtyve Ordinalførsteandentrediefjerdefemtesjettesyvendeottendeniendetiendeelvtetolvtetrettendetyvendeenogtyvende 14-19 are: fjorten, femten, seksten, sytten, atten, nitten. Their ordinals are formed by adding -de, for example fjortende. For the 10s from 30 to 90,…… Continue reading Scandinavian language challenge day 16

Short sitting for breakfast

In North American English, momentarily means in a short time, very soon. But in British English, it means for an infinitesimally short time. So going for breakfast in a Toronto hotel once, I was alarmed by a sign saying “we will seat you momentarily”.